• Really EBSCO??

    A while back I posted a rant about doing a lit search and coming across an EBSCO page that failed to explicitly point to a journal’s wide open CC license.  I was a bit uncomfortable doing so since I felt like maybe I was missing a piece of the copyright/open access puzzle, but it generated a favourable action-oriented response from EBSCO and a few librarians chimed in as well encouraging me that I wasn’t completely crazy with my expectations.   To recap – in case you don’t want to click on the link above – EBSCO’s initial response to my rant was this: Per your request, I have submitted an…

  • Being visible with open access

    Late in the evening on Saturday I was searching around in the EBSCO databases and came across this page and subsequently chirped about it on Twitter.  In that cursory way that I sometimes throw things out on Twitter at 10pm I didn’t really expect an audience for it or to have to do any explaining. It was favourited by somebody at Proquest, and this morning I received a very cordial email from a Senior Technical Support Representative at EBSCO, asking if I could point him to the example in question.  At this point I felt like I owed him an explanation as to why the presentation of the page rubbed me…

  • Open models and open teaching in the bricks and mortar institution

    With mostly excitement and some anxiety, I’ve been thinking ahead to the OpenEd 2009 conference this August at UBC and have been working with Stephen to think about the focus we want to take with our presentation.  Most conference time slots are frustrating in that they really only let you breeze through the surface of your presentation, and hopefully elicit some good questions from the audience who hopefully got something out of your drive-by.  But we’re at a stage with our topic on Open Models where we want to be challenged and pressed to think differently about the topic and what potential might lie with the model.  I think this…

  • Why open is not only good, but necessary

    From David Wiley, this is one of the most persuasive set of slides arguing for  institutions to consider the benefits of being more open about content. My institution needs to begin this conversation in a more coordinated way, and this presentation really nails the argument in my opinion.

  • Quotes of relevance

    I’ve been revisiting some old articles/books that I collected when I was researching autonomy, self-access and language learning. This one from Gill Sturtridge seemed to have relevance to current discussions of informal learning, and open access in general. The information explosion, information technology and increasing student numbers may not only mean the integration and acceptance of self-access centres within the traditional classroom-based teaching institution, but also the complete re-assessment of the mode of delivery of education generally. Institutions could become total providers of self-access learning and the traditional classroom could disappear entirely in some institutions” (1997, p. 68). Sturtridge, G. (1997). Teaching and learning in self-access centres: changing roles? in…

  • some updates

    I’ve begun uploading copies of articles and presentations to the Publications and Presentations part of this site.  It’s a great relief to pull them off my collection of drives, discs, etc, and get them into one place, although I still haven’t located a digital copy of my MA.  Almost all of the articles and presentations are co-authored and co-presented (dissertation excepted, obviously) since I generally prefer the collaboration part of the process.  I’ve also posted drafts of stuff published in locked-down journals, which I have unofficially vowed to avoid in the future.  It really makes no sense to publish in a subscription only journal on so many levels, so I’m…

  • EDEN research workshop

    I’ve been meaning to gather my thoughts on the European Distance Education Network (EDEN) Research Workshop that I recently attended in Paris.  It was my first time attending a European conference, and there was a lot to like. Paris is one of those places that you have to visit at least once in your life, so the location got top marks.  Actually being inside the UNESCO building was admittedly surreal.  The airport-like security to enter the building was one thing, but once inside, the combination of the highly preserved mid-century artifacts and architecture (photos coming) along with energy that only a world organization headquarters can provide made the epic adventure…

  • open learning and language

    An interesting (old) quote from geolinguist and sociolinguist extraordinaire, William Mackey.  I’m parking it here because it’s related to discussions on open learning, and in line with my last post on language and the open access movement. “The combined impact of this accelerating mobility, globalization of instant information and uniformization of mass media has lessened the contact between neighbours while increasing the impact of dominant cultures whose massive loudspeakers silence the small voices of local speech and minority cultures.  In sum, the far erodes the near and eventually drives it out.” Mackey, W.F.  (1992).  Mother tongues, other tongues and link languages: What they mean in a changing world.  Prospects, 22,…

  • Higher ed hacks–the other elephant in the room

    Metapizza kindly pointed to the second option that I offered up as a higher ed hack, noting that it was more of a distributed learning system than a truly open system. I think the point is that distributed learning systems can, and perhaps should be open.  The models I put out there in my last post are really addressing the accreditation problem by working within existing (and seemingly impenetrable) higher ed structures – they are essentially parasitic models, although I would argue that all parties benefit. So maybe they are actually complementary.   There was obviously an international bent to the second model, which was an attempt to address 2…

  • Higher Ed hacks #1–open models

    I’ll borrow the phrase from David Wiley’s recent post and offer my own hack on addressing the accreditation conundrum with OERs.  I’m fairly new to the interesting conversations around open learning, open teaching, open content and open courseware, but as a instructional developer with two feet firmly planted in the distance education world I see these worlds as colliding quite nicely, especially since distance education in Canada has traditionally been driven by a social agenda that sought to provide access to non-traditional learners (of course, it’s up for argument whether this is still the case…).   Accreditation is undeniably the big problem remaining to be solved if open learning is going…

css.php