• MOOCs at the expense of innovation: Micro-learning and community, subscription based, and micro-content elearning models

    I’m a bit late to this party, but there have been some good 2013 summaries of the ed tech world, and Tony Bates’ summary was the one that has resonated the most with me so far.  I think he’s dead-on in his assessment of 2013 when he states: “MOOCs have become a major distraction from developing more innovative and more relevant applications of online learning for credit”. Of course, while we rode the MOOC mania from our respective positions, we may have failed to pay attention to other learning models and platforms that may inspire us to think differently about we can innovate in our institutions.  I’ve been observing the development…

  • Disruption, higher education and other vague discussions

    Brian Lamb’s recent post has me reflecting on much of my discomfort with the disrupting higher education rhetoric, which, if anything, only seems to be gaining ampler.  I’m not sure if he intended this, but in the last paragraph he grounds the mile high disruption conversation in what really matters–innovation that addresses problems of meaningful access to education for students with varying access needs. My discomfort with much of the disruption rhetoric isn’t that higher education doesn’t need a shakeup, but rather it makes sweeping assumptions of “students”, “institutions”, “courses”, “faculty”.  Increasing, disruption is tied to MOOCs, and somewhere in the MOOC-disrupting-higher-education-leading-to-a-learner’s-bill-of-rights mania, “higher education” has never been questioned as…

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